Rice and Kohlrabi; Beef Tendon and Mushroom Curry; Miso Salmon; and Sunomono, Tamago, and Octopus 

I traveled for work this week and went to a little sushi place near my hotel (Sushi Tri in Novato).  The sunomono was nice with a dollop of kani (crab) among the other dishes.  As such, I thought to make my own sunomono but with cucumber and turnip.  Salmon seems to be a consistent fish lately and I made it with miso this week.  As for the “heavy” dish, I made a beef tendon curry with dried white fungus, king oyster, and chive buds to fill me up.  Since I like having a vegetable with my rice, I added kohlrabi this week.

 

Salmon in Misoimg_2563

  1. Mix mirin with red miso and ponzu
  2. Cut salmon with skin into strips and marinate in above mix
  3. Simmer over low heat
  4. Add chive buds near end for 5 minutes to steam
  5. Note I didn’t use the shiso leaves with this salmon dish

 

 

The chives cut through the fatty mouth feel of the salmon skin while the masago (capelin roe) add a salty and crunchy texture.

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img_2562Sunomono, Octopus, Tamago

  1. Slice cucumber and turnips
  2. Mix rice vinegar, sugar, ponzu
  3. Mix in sliced cucumber and turnip in the liquid
  4. Arrange sunomono (pickles), tamago (egg), octopus
  5. Add seaweed to flavor

 

 

 

I like to have one “dish” to be an assortment of food so this mix of pickled cucumber and turnip, tamago, and octopus hits the spot.  I used shiso leaves to separate the components.  Seaweed tops the tamago as a flavor contrast.

img_2569

img_2561Beef tendon curry with white fungus, king oyster, and chives

  1. Slow cook the sliced beef tendon to tenderize it (6 hours high in crock pot with soy, mirin, black sugar)
  2. Mix in dried white fungus to rehydrate and cook
  3. Saute the slice king oyster a wok
  4. Add tendon and white fungus
  5. Add more mirin, water, and soy to ensure adequate liquid
  6. Add curry mix
  7. Add chopped chives in last 5 minutes

 

It’s easier for me to use the crockpot and leave it until ready as opposed to simmering the tendon for at least 2 hours on the stove.  The textures are amazingly glutinous in this curry with a crunch from the chives.

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img_2564

Rice with kohlrabi

  1. Chop kohlrabi into cubes
  2. Cook with rice and water (2 to 1 water to rice)
  3. Once cooked, plate and top with umeboshi

 

 

 

 

The kohlrabi adds a sweetness to the brown rice.

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And so my lunch for the week:

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Ingredient and preparation notes:

  1. Assumed pantry ingredients: soy, ponzu (citrus soy), mirin, sake, miso, rice
  2. Beef tendon can be bought at any asian grocery.  If not beef tendon, you can use short rib meat or any other cut.  Just account for how best to cook that cut.
  3. Dried white fungus is commonly found at any asian grocery.
  4. I bought the tamago and octopus already prepared to make my goal of cooking all four dishes within 90 minutes (prep to cleaning).

Feel free to ask any questions.

Enjoy!

Bento Doctor

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